2018 Cook Inlet Belugas Count! Event

This all-day event aims to bring together citizens to focus on the endangered Cook Inlet beluga whale, fostering local pride, awareness, and stewardship. It is a collaboration between a variety of federal and state agencies, local and national organizations, as well as individuals.  

Belugas Count! logo
2018 Cook Inlet Belugas Count! Event
Saturday, September 15, 2018
10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Anchorage, Alaska
Two locations: Upper Cook Inlet and Alaska Zoo
FREE and open to the public! No registration is required.
Hosted by NOAA Fisheries and partners
An attendee to the Belugas Count! festival views a 3D interactive video of Cook Inlet belugas at The Alaska Zoo, September 9, 2017, Anchorage, Alaska.
An attendee to the Belugas Count! festival views a 3D interactive video of Cook Inlet belugas at The Alaska Zoo, September 9, 2017, Anchorage, Alaska.

 

Belugas Count event Anchorage, AK
About 255 people come out to the Bird Point beluga viewing station for the Belugas Count! event, held Saturday, September 9, 2017 in the greater Anchroage area. Bird Point participants spotted 32 belugas throughout the morning.

 

 

The Belugas Count! event also included an afternoon festival in the Gateway Building at The Alaska Zoo, which included information booths, beluga-themed science talks, and interactive activities. Here, a little girl pushes a button to hear what a Cook Inlet beluga whale sounds like.

The Belugas Count! event also included an afternoon festival in the Gateway Building at The Alaska Zoo, which included information booths, beluga-themed science talks, and interactive activities. Here, a little girl pushes a button to hear what a Cook Inlet beluga whale sounds like.

People brought cameras, binoculars, and spotting scopes to Belugas Count!, hoping to catch a glimpse of a Cook Inlet beluga whale. About 389 people stopped by the Windy Corner viewing station throughout the morning, and spotted up to 18 belugas.

People brought cameras, binoculars, and spotting scopes to Belugas Count!, hoping to catch a glimpse of a Cook Inlet beluga whale. About 389 people stopped by the Windy Corner viewing station throughout the morning, and spotted up to 18 belugas.